Stand! The new hit labor musical

January 17, 2021 @ 5:18 pm

The new film Stand! -- described as Norma Rae meets Hamilton – is set during the 1919 general strike in Winnipeg, Canada, and features an immigrant Romeo and Juliet battling for love and a better life during a time of social upheaval not unlike our own.
Producer and composer Danny Schur talks about it with the New York State AFL-CIO’s podcast Union Strong.
Catch a free screening of Stand! by the DC Labor FilmFest this Tuesday night, January 19, 7p EST, when Labor History Today host Chris Garlock will be doing a live Q&A after the film with Danny Schur, director Robert Adetuyi and actor Gregg Henry. RSVP here
In Part 2 of her online talk Skyscraper Labor and the Places of Labor Protest for The Skyscraper Museum last November, architectural historian Joanna Merwood-Salisbury turns to Union Square in New York City and the movement to improve working conditions for garment industry workers in New York’s commercial lofts in the early twentieth century.
And on Labor History in 2:00, Rick Smith tells us about Standing Against Wage Theft more than a century ago.
Today’s music includes the title track of the musical Stand! sung by Lisa Bell.

Produced and edited by Chris Garlock. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, more than 60 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

You’ll find more Labor History in 2:00 here.

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The Vancouver Island Coal Strike; Skyscraper Labor

January 10, 2021 @ 9:53 pm

This week, the story of the 1912 Vancouver Island Coal Strike -- the most protracted, violent and hard-fought strike in British Columbia's long labour history -- from the On The Line podcast. 
In Part 1 of her online talk for The Skyscraper Museum last November, architectural historian Joanna Merwood-Salisbury traces labor protests in the construction industry in Chicago in the 1880s and examines the formation of unions uniting trades-based groups with ethnic organizations, as well as the public spaces of their protest movements.
And on Labor History in 2:00, Rick Smith tells us about The Rise of Settlement Houses. 
Today’s music includes My Song for the Miner, by Fred White, from a great video  by filmmaker Junie Boudreau, dedicated to Canadian miners from Cape Breton, Nova Scotia and across Canada. Plus, Which Side Are You On, by George Mann.
 
Produced by Chris Garlock; edited by Patrick Dixon. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, more than 60 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

You’ll find more Labor History in 2:00 here. 

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Cutting along the Color Line

January 3, 2021 @ 5:07 pm

Happy New Year from the LHT team! 2020 was certainly a historic year, and here on the Labor History Today podcast the past and present kept colliding in interesting and unusual ways. 
Back in August, Quincy Mills, Professor of History at the University of Maryland in College Park talked with us about black barbers, the evolution of their trade, and its political meaning as a skilled form of labor.
The show also featured poet Martin Espada reading his poem "Castles for the Laborers and Ballgames on the Radio," written for his friend, historian Howard Zinn. 
Here’s our show from August 30, 2020, updated with today’s Labor History in 2, "The Power of Folded Arms and Marching Feet."

Produced by Chris Garlock; edited by Patrick Dixon. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, more than 60 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

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Cordwainers strike of 1805

December 27, 2020 @ 2:04 pm

One of the earliest strikes in the first years of the first industrial revolution in America.
Shoemaking was one of the most lucrative trades in Philadelphia during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Shoemakers – known as cordwainers at the time -- were among the first to organize into journeyman societies in the United States. 
In 1805, cordwainers went on strike over wages and their changing workplace. Northampton Community College Professor of History Patrick Grubbs chronicled the Cordwainers strike of 1805 and explained what came of it on America’s Work Force Union Podcast earlier this month. 
On this week’s Labor History in 2:00, Musicians Fight Back: When it came time to sign union cards, the symphony opposed the election claiming the musicians were independent contractors.
We wrap up this week’s show with Barry Rabin’s song about a little-known 1982 strike…Little girls and boys almost didn't get their toys, the year the elves went out on strike. 

Produced by Chris Garlock, edited by Patrick Dixon. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, nearly 80 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns.

#LaborRadioPod @AWFUnionPodcast @GeorgetownKILWP

 

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The AFL-CIO turns 65

December 20, 2020 @ 5:32 pm

As the nation’s labor federation celebrates a significant anniversary, we hear the voices of AFL president George Meany and CIO president Walter Reuther at the 1955 founding convention of the AFL-CIO, and labor historian Joe McCartin looks at the federation’s past, present and future.
And, on this week’s Labor History in 2:00, The Union is DISSOLVED!

Produced and edited by Chris Garlock. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, nearly 80 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

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Paul Robeson and the 1948 Library of Congress cafeteria workers’ strike

December 13, 2020 @ 6:42 pm

With 95% of DC’s hotel and restaurant workers out of work because of the COVID-19 pandemic, we look back at the history of cafeteria workers’ struggle for a union at the Library of Congress and how singer and activist Paul Robeson supported their 1948 strike.

Former AFSCME organizer and DC 37 Executive Director Lillian Roberts tells how a showdown with New York State Governor Nelson Rockefeller over the right of state workers to organize led to her being jailed for two weeks in December, 1968.

The Heartland Labor Forum talks with Mark Bradley, author of Blood Runs Coal, about the brutal 1968 murder of Jock Yablonski and his family by United Mineworkers president Tony Boyle, and how it inspired a surge in union democracy. 

And, on this week’s Labor History in 2:00, Rick Smith tells us about The Beginning of the End of Apartheid.

Music: Joe Hill and Old Man River, by Paul Robeson; The Jablonski Murder, by Hazel Dickens.

Produced and edited by Chris Garlock. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, nearly 80 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

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America’s last general strike

December 6, 2020 @ 12:14 pm

Every business was shut down. People gathered on street corners and started directing traffic. They made a rule: restaurants were going to close, bars could stay open if they didn't serve hard liquor. They put the jukebox out on the street and people were actually dancing on the streets.

Dancing in the streets during a shutdown? That seems impossible in our current pandemic, but seventy-four years ago, there was indeed a spirit of rejoicing and solidarity in the city of Oakland, California when 100,000 workers walked off their jobs in the last general strike this country has seen.
We’re devoting our entire show this week to remembering the 1946 Oakland General Strike, as Work Week’s Steve Zeltzer interviews labor historian and researcher Gifford Hartford, who talks about how the strike happened and why it’s still relevant today.

On this week’s Labor History in 2:00, Breaking Through the Racial Divide; Rick Smith tells us about the founding of the Colored National Labor Union.
Music: General Strike by Moe Shinola, a musician and former cab driver who lives in Kansas City, Missouri.  

Produced and edited by Chris Garlock. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, nearly 80 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

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Monopoly and Class Struggle: The games we play

November 29, 2020 @ 2:22 pm

When Hasbro, the makers of Monopoly, recently posted bumper third quarter sales figures LHT's Patrick Dixon started to wonder about the political and historical implications of this new wave of pandemic-induced popularity for the most capitalist of all games. On today’s show, Patrick discusses Monopoly and Class Struggle, a once-popular Marxist alternative board game, with Keith Plocek, Professor of Professional Practice at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California.
On America Works, an ongoing podcast series from the Library of Congress, Joyce Vegar, a dedicated home health care worker from Coos County, Oregon, talks about her pride and pleasure as well as her challenges in helping her clients remain in their own homes and communities. Vegar is one of more than 40 home health care workers interviewed by University of Oregon researchers for the “Taking Care” OFP collection. This moving episode highlights the enormous and often unheralded contributions made by workers in this under-documented profession.
And, on this week’s Labor History in 2:00, Rick Smith tells us about The Fight for $15 and a Union. 

Music: Fight for 15 Official Video: Fight for it, with A.D, Arsonisto, Brittany & LV-Produced by KORE. Chicago's fast food and retail workers tell their stories of everyday struggles. Their voices tell us all why we need to Fight for 15!

Produced and edited by Chris Garlock; additional editing by Patrick Dixon. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, nearly 80 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

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Uprising of the 20,000

November 22, 2020 @ 6:53 pm

From 1980 to 1995, during a time of significantly declining membership in most other American labor unions, the Service Employees International Union – SEIU -- nearly doubled its membership. Dr. Timothy Minchin explains why, in this excerpt from the Tales from the Reuther Library podcast.
The Columbine Mine Massacre, which took place on November 21, 1927, was an important moment in the Colorado Mine Wars. Bob Rossi, who hosts a monthly labor segment on the Willamette Wake Up show on KMUZ in Salem, Oregon, discusses miners' organizing efforts.
Plus: On this week’s Labor History in 2:00,  Rick Smith tells the story of the 1909 Uprising of the 20,000.

Produced and edited by Chris Garlock; additional editing by Patrick Dixon. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, nearly 80 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

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A journey down the Working River

November 15, 2020 @ 10:18 am

The UnionDues podcast takes a trip down the River Thames, finding struggles and strikes, insurrection and inspiration. "But take away the Tudor palaces,  Shakespeare’s plays, Handel’s Water Music, great paintings from Turner to Monet and look instead at The Great Rebellion of 1381,  1450’s  Battle of London Bridge, The Nore Sands mutiny of 1797,  1889’s Dock Strike for a minimum wage of 6 old pence a day – the dockers’ tanner.  The history of the Thames is often the history of our trade union movement."
And, on this week’s Labor History in 2: Striking against privatization in Alberta, Canada.

Produced and edited by Chris Garlock. To contribute a labor history item, email laborhistorytoday@gmail.com

Click here to order Working River - Songs and Music of the Thames

Labor History Today is produced by the Metro Washington Council’s Union City Radio and the Kalmanovitz Initiative for Labor and the Working Poor at Georgetown University. We're a proud founding member of the Labor Radio Podcast Network, 70 shows focusing on working people’s issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod

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